An airline in Ireland that mistakenly placed an innocent man on a no-fly list, and even contacted the man’s boss about the matter, has apologized for the apparent mix-up, reports show. 

Airline Ryanair said before Ireland’s High Court that the company “SINCERELY and unreservedly apologised” for wrongly placing Eoin Michael Cahill on a no-fly list over alleged disruptive behavior, Irish newspaper The Journal reported Tuesday, citing court documents. Upon learning of the accusation, Cahill sued the airline for defamation. 

Cahill was reportedly slated to fly from Dublin to Coppenhagen on the low-budget airline on Jan. 2, but remained in Ireland for work purposes. Cahill works for Jones Engineering Group, and frequently flies for work purposes between Ireland and Denmark, The Journal reported. 

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During that Jan. 2 flight, an unidentified separate passenger allegedly became disruptive with airline staff, requiring airport police intervention. The airline said that Cahill had been “mistakenly identified” as the disruptive passenger and placed on the no-fly list. 

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Cahill’s suit argued that the airline defamed him to his own employer, claiming the airline contacted his boss stating the man was “disruptive” and barred from flying on Ryanair. Cahill said the mix-up has hurt his professional reputation, as he’s a frequent traveler. 

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The airline apologized, and offered to pay Cahill’s legal fees in addition to roughly $10,700 in compensation. The airline also said it would write a letter to Cahill’s employers clarifying the accusations are “fully withdrawn,” The Journal reported. 

The case officially closed on Tuesday, Business Insider reported. Ryanair did not immediately respond to Fox News Digital’s request for comment.