It seems that the see-through pants are the last straw for MLB players regarding their new uniforms.

Nike and Major League Baseball have caught flack for the new baseball jerseys this year due to their “cheap” look – that is what pitchers Rich Hill and Miles Mikolas said of the uniforms, despite other players promoting their stretchiness and lighter feel.

Their sentiments seemed legitimate when photos surfaced of tucked-in jerseys clearly visible through white pants. Plus, when San Francisco Giants’ Casey Schmitt had his photoshoot, his lower region was clearly visible.

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Now, players are going to the MLBPA in hopes of a change before Opening Day on March 28.

“It’s disappointing that we’ve landed in a place where the uniforms are the topic of discussion,” MLBPA executive director Tony Clark said Thursday, via ESPN. “Each conversation with the guys is yielding more information with what we’re seeing.”

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“A lot of the rhetoric is confirmation that the pants are see-through,” Clark added, saying that the pants are a “universal concern.” 

“It’s been an ongoing conversation where each day has yielded something new that doesn’t seem to make as much sense as you would like it.”

The last names on the back of jerseys look noticeably smaller, leading to most fans complaining about them. However, MLB senior vice president of global consumer products Denis Nolan maintained that the uniforms are top-notch.

“In acquiring Majestic and its MLB uniform manufacturing facilities in Easton, PA — which have been making player uniforms for nearly two decades — Fanatics has consistently produced world-class uniforms, including every Nike-branded MLB on-field jersey and all City Connect gear since 2020,” Nolan said, via MLB.com.

The league tested the uniforms on hundreds of players, debuting them in last year’s All-Star Game to favorable reviews. Fanatics actually measured every player last year, and Nike body-scanned over 300 players to get the ideal fit.

“It was a very technological approach to outfitting players,” MLB exec Stephen Roche said. “Everything was performance-driven.”

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