A European woman recently stumbled upon buried treasure from the Middle Ages in what archaeologists are calling a once-in-a-decade discovery.

In a press release that was translated into English, the Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences (ARUP) explained that the treasure was found by a woman walking in Kutná Hora. The town is located in the Central Bohemian Region of the Czech Republic.

The treasure consisted of over 2,150 silver coins, minted between 1085 and 1107. Experts believe they were manufactured in Prague and imported to Bohemia.

“The [discovery was] made of coin alloy, which, in addition to silver, also contains an admixture of copper, lead and trace metals,” the ARUP explained in the May 16 press release. “Determining this particular composition can also help determine the origin of the silver used.”

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Archaeologist Filip Velímský said that the treasure was hidden during a time of political instability. The trove was stored in a ceramic container that was destroyed over the years, but archaeologists discovered the bottom of the container.

“At that time, there were disputes in the country between the members of the Přemysl dynasty about the princely throne of Prague.” the historian explained. ARUP says that battles were common during the period, and believes the depot could have been cash “for paying wages or spoils of war.”

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Velímský added that the value of the ancient coins was “unimaginable” during the the time period.

“Unfortunately, for the turn of the 11th–12th century, we lack data on the purchasing power of contemporary coins.,” he explained. “But it was a huge, unimaginable – and at the same time, unavailable – amount for an ordinary person. It can be compared to winning a million in the jackpot.”

Czech officials call the discovery “one of the largest finds of the last decade.”

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“More than 2,000 silver coins represented a huge amount in their time,” the ARUP press release said. 

Historians are now working to process the coins, which includes putting them through x-rays and determining what material the coins are made from. The artifacts will then be put up on display during an exhibit expected to debut in 2025.

Fox News Digital reached out to ARUP for comment.

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